Health Benefits of Ceylon Cinnamon

Ceylon cinnamon

There are two main types of cinnamon

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  • Ceylon cinnamon: Also known as "true" cinnamon.
  • Cassia cinnamon: The more common variety today and what people generally refer to as "cinnamon."

Cinnamon is made by cutting the stems of cinnamon trees. The inner bark is then extracted and the woody parts removed.

When it dries, it forms strips that curl into rolls, called cinnamon sticks. These sticks can be ground to form cinnamon powder.

The distinct smell and flavor of cinnamon are due to the oily part, which is very high in the compound cinnamaldehyde

Scientists believe that this compound is responsible for most of cinnamon's powerful effects on health and metabolism.

 

Antioxidants protect your body from oxidative damage caused by free radicals.

Cinnamon is loaded with powerful antioxidants, such as polyphenols

In a study that compared the antioxidant activity of 26 spices, cinnamon wound up as the clear winner, even outranking "superfoods" like garlic and oregano

In fact, it is so powerful that cinnamon can be used as a natural food preservative

 

Inflammation is incredibly important.

It helps your body fight infections and repair tissue damage.

However, inflammation can become a problem when it’s chronic and directed against your body's own tissues.

Cinnamon may be useful in this regard. Studies show that this spice and its antioxidants have potent anti-inflammatory properties

 

Cinnamon has been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease, the world's most common cause of premature death.

In people with type 2 diabetes, 1 gram or about half a teaspoon of cinnamon per day has been shown to have beneficial effects on blood markers.

It reduces levels of total cholesterol, “bad” LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while “good” HDL cholesterol remains stable

More recently, a big review study concluded that a cinnamon dose of just 120 mg per day can have these effects. In this study, cinnamon also increased “good” HDL cholesterol levels

In animal studies, cinnamon has been shown to reduce blood pressure

When combined, all these factors may drastically cut your risk of heart disease.

 

Insulin is one of the key hormones that regulate metabolism and energy use.

It’s also essential for transporting blood sugar from your bloodstream to your cells.

The problem is that many people are resistant to the effects of insulin.

This is known as insulin resistance, a hallmark of serious conditions like metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

The good news is that cinnamon can dramatically reduce insulin resistance, helping this important hormone do its job

By increasing insulin sensitivity, cinnamon can lower blood sugar levels.

 

Cinnamon is well known for its blood-sugar-lowering properties.

Apart from the beneficial effects on insulin resistance, cinnamon can lower blood sugar by several other mechanisms.

First, cinnamon has been shown to decrease the amount of glucose that enters your bloodstream after a meal.

It does this by interfering with numerous digestive enzymes, which slows the breakdown of carbohydrates in your digestive tract.

Second, a compound in cinnamon can act on cells by mimicking insulin .

This greatly improves glucose uptake by your cells, though it acts much slower than insulin itself.

Numerous human studies have confirmed the anti-diabetic effects of cinnamon, showing that it can lower fasting blood sugar levels by 10 to 29%.

 

Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by progressive loss of the structure or function of brain cells.

Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease are two of the most common types.

Two compounds found in cinnamon appear to inhibit the buildup of a protein called tau in the brain, which is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease

In a study in mice with Parkinson's disease, cinnamon helped protect neurons, normalized neurotransmitter levels and improved motor function .

These effects need to be studied further in humans.

 

Cancer is a serious disease, characterized by uncontrolled cell growth.

Cinnamon has been widely studied for its potential use in cancer prevention and treatment.

Overall, the evidence is limited to test-tube and animal studies, which suggest that cinnamon extracts may protect against cancer

It acts by reducing the growth of cancer cells and the formation of blood vessels in tumors and appears to be toxic to cancer cells, causing cell death.

A study in mice with colon cancer revealed that cinnamon is a potent activator of detoxifying enzymes in the colon, protecting against further cancer growth

These findings were supported by test-tube experiments, which showed that cinnamon activates protective antioxidant responses in human colon cells

Whether cinnamon has any effect in living, breathing humans needs to be confirmed in controlled studies.

 

Cinnamaldehyde, one of the main active components of cinnamon, may help fight various kinds of infection.

Cinnamon oil has been shown to effectively treat respiratory tract infections caused by fungi.

It can also inhibit the growth of certain bacteria, including Listeria and Salmonella

However, the evidence is limited and so far cinnamon has not been shown to reduce infections elsewhere in the body.

The antimicrobial effects of cinnamon may also help prevent tooth decay and reduce bad breath .

 

HIV is a virus that slowly breaks down your immune system, which can eventually lead to AIDS, if untreated.

Cinnamon extracted from Cassia varieties is thought to help fight against HIV-1, the most common strain of the HIV virus in humans .

A laboratory study looking at HIV-infected cells found that cinnamon was the most effective treatment of all 69 medicinal plants studied .

Human trials are needed to confirm these effects.

 

Not all cinnamon is created equal.

The Cassia variety contains significant amounts of a compound called coumarin, which is believed to be harmful in large doses.

All cinnamon should have health benefits, but Cassia may cause problems in large doses due to the coumarin content.

Ceylon ("true" cinnamon) is much better in this regard, and studies show that it’s much lower in coumarin than the Cassia variety

Can You Have Too Much? Possible Cinnamon Side Effects and Precautions

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When used in moderation, cinnamon is generally safe and can be consumed with minimal risk of side effects. High amounts of cinnamon — and cassia cinnamon in particular — can cause several adverse symptoms. This is due to the presence of a compound called coumarin, which has been shown to damage the liver in large amounts.

While Ceylon cinnamon contains only trace amounts, cassia cinnamon is much higher in coumarin. Excess consumption of the coumarin found in cassia cinnamon has also been linked to other health problems, including an increased risk of cancer development.

Because of its anti-diabetic properties, cinnamon may also contribute to low blood sugar levels, especially if you’re taking blood sugar-lowering medications already. Cinnamon consumption has also been associated with breathing problems and mouth sores in some people.

Cinnamon is not known to cause negative reactions or allergies, especially when used in small amounts the way that it most commonly is.  At times, when taking cinnamon extract supplements or using cinnamon essential oil, it’s possible to take too much, which can interfere with other medicines and medical conditions.

Cinnamon can become unsafe if you take too many cinnamon supplements, especially if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, have diabetes, have liver disease or recently had surgery. Always make sure you read the recommended dose of cinnamon extracts and other herbal extracts and don’t consume more than is recommended without speaking with your doctor first in order to avoid complications.

 
  Ceylon cinnamon bottle  
90 capsules
$21.00
Suggested dosage:
Take one three times daily
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